POST-SKILLSHARE NOTES

Dee's Personal Notes & Reminders

Thank you for joining us during our Introduction to Shibari event! Here’s a glimpse at some of my personal notes when it comes to rope bondage.

I’m neither an expert nor am I a medical professional so take them with a grain of salt and a bucket of your best judgement.

That said, I hope that you continue to seek out learning when it comes to rope here or abroad, or consider going through our compilation of resources on the Shibari.ph website!

Bondage Safety – Safer Placement

We’ve covered during the skillshares that danger is an ever present part of bondage. We’ve compiled links so you can remember crucial details like general safety tips and  where it’s safe to tie your partner (since just avoiding joints isn’t enough)!

Nerve Damage Flyer (PDF) from Place des Cordes (Clickable)

Find this “Nerve Damage Flyer” and more links when you visit our Resources Page and scroll down to the Safety References.

Dropping & Aftercare

Sugar rushes tend to come with a crash and the same applies to Kink Spacing during bondage being followed by Kink Dropping

We hope that your experience was a positive one and hope that saying goodbye to the natural high from kink doesn’t bring with it any of the unpleasant feelings and hard-to-describe issues that come with Dropping.

However, if it does, that’s perfectly normal and not a sign of weakness on your part!

Click below to find resources on providing proper aftercare when your partner feels down by visiting our Resources Page and scrolling to After Your Session!

The Single Column Tie

There are different ways to end/lock the single column tie: we have options like the square knot, the granny knot, the fast bowline, and more.

Each of these have their distinct advantages/disadvantages, one of those being the likelihood in which the knot might collapse when under different situations.

Jute rope tends to have better tooth or friction that keeps its knots in place, so when I use synthetic rope that are smoother, I prefer using the Somerville Bowline (which is credited to FL Topologist, whom you can find on Fetlife.com).

This gives me peace of mind, knowing it won’t collapse as a result of pulling hard, bouncing, and when subject to other conditions, etc.

Somerville Bowline (Dee’s Notes)

Over time, you’ll develop your own style or preference when it comes to tying your knots, manipulating rope, and doing your checks. 

When doing the Somerville Bowline, I prefer to form the loop by twisting the rope and pulling the bight through, instead of looping it around the bight like WykD_Dave does (video below). This gives me an easier time, especially when I’m working with rope that uses a longer bight (such as the Double Column Tie, which you’ll also see below).

Here’s a video sharing my personal notes on the Somerville Bowline:
4 Helpful Criteria for Solid Single Column Ties
  1. Even Wrap Tension
    • Keep your wraps even and free from twists/overlaps as you apply them. This helps us to best emulate flat bands which distribute the tension and pressure across the limb instead of being solely focused on a specific area, which increases the chances of discomfort or injury. 
  2. Reasonable Wrap Size
    • Keep your wraps at a size/level of tightness that’s not too tight that it chokes the limb nor too large that the limb can slip out. 
    • Recommendation: Dee likes to check if there’s enough space to slip in one finger or two slender ones and still easily slide them sideways. Finger sizes differ though!
  3. Well Compacted Knot
    • Too loose and your wraps can lose their tension. In worse cases— it might undo the whole knot. Study the structure of the knot itself and pull in the right places rather than relying on brute force.
    • Recommendation: Having no twists and overlaps helps you keep your knots nice and small.
  4. Reasonable Bight Length
    • Too short and they can slip out of your Somerville Bowline. Too long means you’ve used up rope that could have gone to your working end for further bondage instead.
    • Recommendation: Dee likes to keep them around 2-3 inches long unless that specific tie requires a far longer bight (as is the case in some styles of gote shibari).

Somerville Bowline (Original/Topologist style)

Here’s a tutorial video by Lochai Stine:

Somerville Bowline (WykD_Dave style)

In this video, WykD_Dave shares his way of doing the SB that’s faster and has fewer steps.

Depending on the orientation of your twist, you might end up with the Somerville Bowline or the Struggler’s Knot. Both are pretty safe, although WykD_Dave explains that the SK is a bit easier to undo. 

He explains the differences here.

The Double Column Tie

Since the Double Column Tie requires us to go around both wraps and cinch (tighten) them closer, we can’t just do the SB the same way as in a Single Column Tie.

If we do, any pressure from the two wraps that try to pull them apart will end up pulling the bight back out of the loop—which is exactly how we intentionally undo the SB—so we ought to avoid that in this case.

Check out this video from Crash-Restraint.com below on how to properly apply the SB on the Double Column Tie that eliminates that risk.

More Details

We’re glad you’re interested in taking your rope journey further!

If you want to explore and practice rope in a supportive and kink-friendly environment, you’re invited to join us when we host our Shibari.ph Saturdays!

We host casual practice events called Rope Jams where you can watch, get to know, and tie alongside various other rope practitioners from the local community.

We also host Rope Study Groups with different topics every month where we discuss various aspects of rope bondage that serve as building blocks for more complex games play down the road!

Private Coaching is available for folks with a private event, incompatible schedules, stricter privacy requirements, or specific requests/objectives. 

For announcements, kindly join our newsletter (for perks like early registration) or stay tuned to the Shibari.ph FB Page for updates and event schedules!

Whether you’re interested in jute rope or synthetic polypropylene, you can message Dee via the Shibari.ph FB page or through email at [email protected]!

Do you have more questions?

Send us an email at [email protected] or message us through the Shibari.ph Facebook Page.

Happy tying!